Open Access
Article

Homotopy of resting-state functional connectivity correlates with psychological distress in adolescent and young adult cancer patients

Jianfei Xie1,Lijun Li2,*,†,Lu Wang2,Panpan Xiao2,Xiangyu Liu4,Yunjie Liao5,*,†,Andy SK Cheng6
1
Department of Nursing, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 410000 Changsha, Hunan, China
2
Xiangya Nursing School, Central South University, 410000 Changsha, Hunan, China
3
School of Computer Science and Engineering, Central South University, 410000 Changsha, Hunan, China
4
Department of Health Management Center, Hunan Cancer Hospital, 410000 Changsha, Hunan, China
5
Department of Radiology, The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, 410000 Changsha, Hunan, China
6
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, 999077 Kowloon, Hong Kong
DOI: 10.52586/5041 Volume 26 Issue 12, pp.1470-1479
Submited: 15 August 2021 Revised: 01 November 2021
Accepted: 02 November 2021 Published: 30 December 2021
*Corresponding Author(s):  
Lijun Li
E-mail:  
197811030@csu.edu.cn
*Corresponding Author(s):  
Yunjie Liao
E-mail:  
liaoyj223@csu.edu.cn
These authors contributed equally.
Copyright: © 2021 The author(s). Published by BRI. This is an open access article under the CC BY 4.0 license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Abstract

Background: Adolescent and young adult cancer patients (AYACPs) experience a high incidence of psychological distress. However, the effect of psychological distress on the functional connectivity between the hemispheres in AYACPs remains unknown. Voxel-mirrored homotopy connectivity detection is an effective way to explore the effects of psychological distress on functional connectivity throughout the brain in AYACPs. Methods: Twenty-four AYACPs underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Voxel-mirrored homotopy connectivity in the psychological distress group was significantly lower in the superior parietal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus (orbital part), superior frontal gyrus (dorsolateral), superior occipital gyrus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, calcarine fissure and surrounding cortex than in the non-psychological distress group, while in the inferior temporal gyrus and middle frontal gyrus (orbital part), voxel-mirrored homotopy connectivity was significantly higher (p << 0.05). ROC curve analysis showed that the decrease in voxel-mirrored homotopy connectivity in the following brain regions was helpful in distinguishing the psychological distress group from the non-psychological distress group: left superior frontal gyrus (dorsolateral), left calcarine fissure and surrounding cortex, right postcentral gyrus, and left precuneus. Conclusions: Activity imbalances in multiple brain regions exist in AYACPs with psychological distress. Voxel-mirrored homotopy connectivity detection is an effective way to explore the potential neural mechanisms of mental disorders in AYACPs and optimize the treatment of mental disorders.

Key words

Psychological distress; Resting-state; Func-tional neuroimaging; AYACPs; Cancer

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Jianfei Xie, Lijun Li, Lu Wang, Panpan Xiao, Xiangyu Liu, Yunjie Liao, Andy SK Cheng. Homotopy of resting-state functional connectivity correlates with psychological distress in adolescent and young adult cancer patients. Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark. 2021. 26(12); 1470-1479.