Open Access
Review
Regulation of cellular responses by deubiquitinating enzymes: an update
James F. Burrows1,*,James A. Johnston2
1
School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT9 7BL
2
Centre for Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast, Northern Ireland,BT9 7BL
DOI: 10.2741/3980 Volume 17 Issue 3, pp.1184-1200
Published: 01 January 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Regulation of signalling in health and disease)
*Corresponding Author(s):  
James F. Burrows
E-mail:  
j.burrows@qub.ac.uk
Abstract

The conjugation of ubiquitin as either a monomer or as a chain has long been known to regulate the stability, localisation, trafficking and/or function of many intracellular proteins. However, the recent explosion in our knowledge of the enzymes responsible for the removal of ubiquitin suggests they also play an important role in the regulation of many processes. Here we examine what is known about the role of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), with particular emphasis upon their impact on cellular responses to external stimuli. In addition, we look at the evidence that although these enzymes are heavily outnumbered by those responsible for ubiquitin conjugation, that these enzymes may still be important cellular regulators, due to their ability to play multiple roles which can be cell type and cell context specific.

Key words

Deubiquitinating, Intracellular Signaling, Transcription, Receptor Trafficking, Cell Cycle, Disease, Cell Migration, Review

Share and Cite
James F. Burrows, James A. Johnston. Regulation of cellular responses by deubiquitinating enzymes: an update. Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark. 2012. 17(3); 1184-1200.