Open Access
Article
Development of a human neural stem cell line for use in recovery from disability after stroke
Paul Stroemer1,Andrew Hope1,Sara Patel1,Kenny Pollock1,John Sinden1
1
ReNeuron Ltd. 10 Nugent Rd, Guildford, Surrey, UK GU2 7AF. Paul-Stroemer@reneuron.com
DOI: 10.2741/2842 Volume 13 Issue 6, pp.2290-2292
Published: 01 January 2008
Abstract

A clonal human neural stem cell line (ReN001) has been developed for clinical use in the treatment of stable disability after stroke. This cell line has been conditionally immortalized using the fusion transgene c-mycERTAM to allow controlled expansion when cultured in the presence of 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The cell line has been banked and fully characterized to assure there is genetic stability and no phenotypic drift with extended passages. In vivo studies determined the ability of the cell line to survive after implantation into damaged brain and its efficacy in the reduction of chronic behavioural dysfunction after implantation into a rodent model of stroke damage. A further study was conducted in this model and a dose-dependent effect was observed on behavioural recovery. No safety or toxicology issues were identified in in vivo studies with this cell line, which made REN001 a strong candidate for one of the first cell-based IND applications to be submitted to the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for consideration for the treatment of stroke in humans.

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Paul Stroemer, Andrew Hope, Sara Patel, Kenny Pollock, John Sinden. Development of a human neural stem cell line for use in recovery from disability after stroke. Frontiers in Bioscience-Landmark. 2008. 13(6); 2290-2292.